The Art of Thinking Clearly

November 9, 2019 - Comment

Have you ever… Invested time in something that, in hindsight, just wasn’t worth it? Paid too much in an eBay auction? Continued to do something you knew was bad for you? Sold stocks too late, or too early? Taken credit for success, but blamed failure on external circumstances? Backed the wrong horse? These are examples

Have you ever…

Invested time in something that, in hindsight, just wasn’t worth it?
Paid too much in an eBay auction?
Continued to do something you knew was bad for you?
Sold stocks too late, or too early?
Taken credit for success, but blamed failure on external circumstances?
Backed the wrong horse?

These are examples of what the author calls cognitive biases, simple errors all of us make in day-to-day thinking. But by knowing what they are and how to identify them, we can avoid them and make better choices: Whether in dealing with personal problems or business negotiations, trying to save money or earn profits, or merely working out what we really want in life – and strategizing the best way to get it.

Already an international bestseller, The Art of Thinking Clearly distills cutting-edge research from behavioral economics, psychology, and neuroscience into a clever, practical guide for anyone who’s ever wanted to be wiser and make better decisions. A novelist, thinker, and entrepreneur, Rolf Dobelli deftly shows that in order to lead happier, more prosperous lives, we don’t need extra cunning, new ideas, shiny gadgets, or more frantic hyperactivity – all we need is less irrationality.

Simple, clear, and always surprising, this indispensable audiobook will change the way you think and transform your decision making – at work, at home, every day. From why you shouldn’t accept a free drink to why you should walk out of a movie you don’t like, from why it’s so hard to predict the future to why you shouldn’t watch the news, The Art of Thinking Clearly helps solve the puzzle of human reasoning.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Riddled with plagiarism, very disappointing I read Nassim Taleb’s Fooled By Randomness and then started reading this book. It felt like deja vu in the first few chapters since so much content has been lifted directly from FBR. I didn’t do word-for-word comparisons, but others have. The plagiarism was so strong, I had to go research it to make sure I wasn’t fooling myself. Sure enough, Dobelli has been outed as a plagiarist. I got through 30 chapters or so before I started feeling too guilty to continue.I can’t even recommend…

Anonymous says:

including the highly intelligent, resulting in everyone falling into the same cognitive … In the 1960s psychologists began to examine scientifically, how people think, decide and take action. The result, explains the author of this book, Rolf Dobelli, was a “theory of irrationality that states: thinking is in itself not pure, but prone to error.” This, they found, was true of all people, including the highly intelligent, resulting in everyone falling into the same cognitive errors.More interestingly, it appears we all “systematically err in the same direction.” If this is…

Anonymous says:

The author needs to read his own book. The author’s own biases bleed through the prose so deeply, it leaves me wondering if he’s read his own book. With no corroborating evidence, the author repeatedly asserts that cognitive errors are nothing more than remnants of survival behaviora from hunter-gatherer societies. He also repeatedly fails to restrain himself from inserting little digs on so-called “pseudoscientific” topics, from dietary supplements and chiropractic to UFOs and thought-influenced reality, while making little…

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