The Investment Answer

October 19, 2019 - Comment

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What if there were a way to cut through all the financial mumbo-jumbo? Wouldn’t it be great if someone could really explain to us–in plain and simple English–the basics we must know about investing in order to insure our financial freedom?

At last, here’s good news.

Jargon-free and written for all investors–experienced, beginner, and everyone in between–The Investment Answer distills the process into just five decisions–five straightforward choices that can lead to safe and sound ways to manage your money.

When Wall Street veteran Gordon Murray told his good friend and financial advisor, Dan Goldie, that he had only six months to live, Dan responded, “Do you want to write that book you’ve always wanted to do?” The result is this eminently valuable primer which can be read and understood in one sitting, and has advice that benefits you, not Wall Street and the rest of the traditional financial services industry.

The Investment Answer asks readers to make five basic but key decisions to stack the investment odds in their favor. The advice is simple, easy-to-follow, and effective, and can lead to a more profitable portfolio for every investor. Specifically:

Should I invest on my own or seek help from an investment professional? How should I allocate my investments among stocks, bonds, and cash? Which specific asset classes within these broad categories should I include in my portfolio? Should I take an actively managed approach to investing, or follow a passive alternative? When should I sell assets and when should I buy more?

In a world of fast-talking traders who believe that they can game the system and a market characterized by instability, this extraordinary and timely book offers guidance every investor should have.

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Comments

Anonymous says:

Fantastic Book. Data Driven. Financial Advisors and Brokers HATE The Truths That Are In Here! Great book that pretty much states what Warren Buffet and Charles Schwab have said for years; you can’t capitalize on market inefficiencies (and arbitrage them) in the long run, especially with today’s technologies. If you are the average investor, indexing with appropriate asset allocation and weighting based on your target age trigger and risk acceptance will beat active management every time. Period.My only disagreement is that they advise a fee-only advisor. I think this is not really…

Anonymous says:

Excellent advice that helped me immensely through the four years since my wife died After my wife died, I spent several months mourning and just getting by, paying bills and responding whenever necessary to financial imperative. Frankly, despite many years of successful investing, I was lost and didn’t know where to start.A friend sent me this excellent short survey of how to invest for my future, and I followed their plan of action:I evaluated my personal investment goals and time frame.I worked out a sense of my tolerance for risk…

Anonymous says:

Don’t buy gold! Given the daily barrage of investment shows, the non-stop stream of investment advice, the obsession of millions of Americans with the market–as a hobby, a lottery, a game at which you win or lose–this is a productive book to read even if you think you know the “investment answer” to begin with. The public’s constant preoccupation with “star” fund managers, with ratings of funds that, after 10 years, tend to converge, whether growth funds or money market funds, in percentages gained and…

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