The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business

August 7, 2019 - Comment

Getting an MBA is an expensive choice-one almost impossible to justify regardless of the state of the economy. Even the elite schools like Harvard and Wharton offer outdated, assembly-line programs that teach you more about PowerPoint presentations and unnecessary financial models than what it takes to run a real business. You can get better results

Getting an MBA is an expensive choice-one almost impossible to justify regardless of the state of the economy. Even the elite schools like Harvard and Wharton offer outdated, assembly-line programs that teach you more about PowerPoint presentations and unnecessary financial models than what it takes to run a real business. You can get better results (and save hundreds of thousands of dollars) by skipping business school altogether. 

Josh Kaufman founded PersonalMBA.com as an alternative to the business school boondoggle. His blog has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to the best business books and most powerful business concepts of all time. Now, he shares the essentials of entrepreneurship, marketing, sales, negotiation, operations, productivity, systems design, and much more, in one comprehensive volume. The Personal MBA distills the most valuable business lessons into simple, memorable mental models that can be applied to real-world challenges. 

The Personal MBA explains concepts such as: The Iron Law of the Market: Why every business is limited by the size and quality of the market it attempts to serve-and how to find large, hungry markets. The 12 Forms of Value: Products and services are only two of the twelve ways you can create value for your customers. The Pricing Uncertainty Principle: All prices are malleable. Raising your prices is the best way to dramatically increase profitability – if you know how to support the price you’re asking. 4 Methods to Increase Revenue: There are only four ways a business can bring in more money. Do you know what they are? True leaders aren’t made by business schools – they make themselves, seeking out the knowledge, skills, and experience they need to succeed. Read this book and you will learn the principles it takes most business professionals a lifetime of trial and error to master.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Breadth-Centric Approach Done Totally Right This book is broad and shallow, but impeccably indexed and thoughtfully curated. It’s also beautifully and concisely written.Everything is organized into topic with detailed outlines, so that you can pick and choose as needed. So many books (see any Tim Ferriss book) throw everything and the kitchen sink with no focus or filter just to fill pages and put out another crappy round of sales; they’re all fluff and the meat they contain is so basic that the author tries to pass it off as…

Anonymous says:

Great book! Think of this book as a summary of several topics related to managing a business.The book is somewhat divided into 3 parts:Part 1 talks about the parts of the business: value creation, marketing, sales, value delivery and financeThis is where the book excels in my opinion. As I said it is only a summary, but a very useful one for someone just beginning.Part 2 is about the human side of the business and is only superficial which is understandable because the…

Anonymous says:

Solid overview of principles / Not a replacement for an MBA Pros: good overview of MBA principles, and a good read for anyone prior to an MBA (to help you understand what you are getting into, and inform your career recruiting decisions)Cons: none. Pretty good.Overall: I would buy it again. I don’t know that it is a stand-out over the other handful of highly rated MBA books, but it is still a solid overview. You won’t go wrong buying it.

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