Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents: How to Heal from Distant, Rejecting, or Self-Involved Parents

December 30, 2019 - Comment

If you grew up with an emotionally immature, unavailable, or selfish parent, you may have lingering feelings of anger, loneliness, betrayal, or abandonment. You may recall your childhood as a time when your emotional needs were not met, when your feelings were dismissed, or when you took on adult levels of responsibility in an effort

If you grew up with an emotionally immature, unavailable, or selfish parent, you may have lingering feelings of anger, loneliness, betrayal, or abandonment. You may recall your childhood as a time when your emotional needs were not met, when your feelings were dismissed, or when you took on adult levels of responsibility in an effort to compensate for your parent’s behavior. These wounds can be healed, and you can move forward in your life.

In this breakthrough book, clinical psychologist Lindsay Gibson exposes the destructive nature of parents who are emotionally immature or unavailable. You will see how these parents create a sense of neglect, and discover ways to heal from the pain and confusion caused by your childhood. By freeing yourself from your parents’ emotional immaturity, you can recover your true nature, control how you react to them, and avoid disappointment. Finally, you’ll learn how to create positive, new relationships so you can build a better life.

Discover the four types of difficult parents:

The emotional parent instills feelings of instability and anxietyThe driven parent stays busy trying to perfect everything and everyoneThe passive parent avoids dealing with anything upsettingThe rejecting parent is withdrawn, dismissive, and derogatory

 

Product Features

  • Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents How to Heal from Distant Rejecting or Self Involved Parents

Comments

Anonymous says:

Excellent book Recently, I read 3-4 books on children of narcissistic or self-absorbed parents. Each one was valuable in its own way, helping me untangle my thoughts and feelings.What I like about this book, in particular, is that is reveals the systematic nature of emotionally immature thinking, which underlies the behavior of parents, lovers, friends, and public figures. By revealing the pattern and then explaining the cause (self-protection), it allows the reader to depersonalize the behavior…

Anonymous says:

Great book As a 73-year-old man who, as a much younger man, underwent 12 years of life-saving psychoanalysis, I can vouch for the fact that anyone whose parents did not love him or her, despite all attempts to heal, will most likely live their entire life with a hole in their heart that never quite heals. The condition can be coped with, but never quite eradicated. I’m not a reader of “self-help” books, but was attracted to this one by its title, having no idea that a category like this existed…

Anonymous says:

If you weren’t badly “abused,” but still didn’t feel like your family really embraced you, this is the book for you. There are a few negative reviews that accuse the book of being judgmental and fostering dangerous, exaggerated attitudes toward parents. I actually didn’t see that at all. This book gives a name to the subtle disengagement, distance and neglect kids suffer at the hands of parents who probably do a great job of providing food, clothing, shelter and physical safety.I burst into tears reading the chapters on internalizers and how they end up dealing with this; it was like reading my…

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