Lost Children Archive: A novel

February 12, 2020 - Comment

ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR ONE OF BARACK OBAMA’S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: THE WASHINGTON POST • TIME MAGAZINE • NPR • CHICAGO TRIBUNE • GQ • O, THE OPRAH MAGAZINE • THE GUARDIAN • VANITY FAIR • THE ATLANTIC • THE WEEK • THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS • LIT HUB • KIRKUS REVIEWS • THE NEW YORK PUBLIC

ONE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR

ONE OF BARACK OBAMA’S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR

ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR:
THE WASHINGTON POST • TIME MAGAZINE • NPR • CHICAGO TRIBUNE • GQ • O, THE OPRAH MAGAZINE • THE GUARDIAN • VANITY FAIR • THE ATLANTIC • THE WEEK • THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS • LIT HUB • KIRKUS REVIEWS • THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY • BOSTON.COM • PUREWOW

“An epic road trip [that also] captures the unruly intimacies of marriage and parenthood. . . . This is a novel that daylights our common humanity, and challenges us to reconcile our differences.” —The Washington Post

In Valeria Luiselli’s fiercely imaginative follow-up to the American Book Award-winning Tell Me How It Ends, an artist couple set out with their two children on a road trip from New York to Arizona in the heat of summer. As the family travels west, the bonds between them begin to fray: a fracture is growing between the parents, one the children can almost feel beneath their feet.
 
Through ephemera such as songs, maps and a Polaroid camera, the children try to make sense of both their family’s crisis and the larger one engulfing the news: the stories of thousands of kids trying to cross the southwestern border into the United States but getting detained—or lost in the desert along the way.
 
A breath-taking feat of literary virtuosity, Lost Children Archive is timely, compassionate, subtly hilarious, and formally inventive—a powerful, urgent story about what it is to be human in an inhuman world.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Dry I’ll get right to the flaws of this novel. It’s dry and self-centered. The setup is intriguing. A relatively newly married couple, with two kids each from previous relationships, is trying to make a life together. The couple met and connected while working on a research project together. But that project is completed and now they are working on separate, individual projects, and that is bringing challenges to their relationship. And then they’re going through all the usual ups and downs of…

Anonymous says:

Stunning Tell Me How It Ends is the kind of book I told people about for months after I read it–so I’ve been (im)patiently waiting for Luiselli’s next work. It does not disappoint.It’s beautiful, original, luminous, and provocative. I’m not one to write long reviews. If a book moves me, it moves me. If it challenges me, it challenges me. Lost Children Archive did all of that. It’s such a stunning read.I’d like to get this book into everyone’s hands in the country right now. We…

Anonymous says:

Complex and haunting I loved this novel. It works on many different levels at once and challenges the mind as well as the heart. On one level, this is a story of a family of four on a cross-country road trip. The parents are sound documentarians (or documentarists—there’s some discussion in the book about the difference), and they are heading to the American Southwest to capture sounds related to Apaches and unaccompanied refugee children, respectively. Luiselli clearly writes from experience as a parent because…

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