The Hero

December 26, 2019 - Comment

WHAT MAKES A HERO? WHO BETTER TO ANSWER THAT QUESTION THAN LEE CHILD… ‘It’s Lee Child. Why would you not read it?’ Karin Slaughter ‘I don’t know another author so skilled at making me turn the page’ The Times In his first work of nonfiction, the creator of the multimillion-selling Jack Reacher series explores the endurance of heroes from Achilles

WHAT MAKES A HERO? WHO BETTER TO ANSWER THAT QUESTION THAN LEE CHILD…

‘It’s Lee Child. Why would you not read it?’ Karin Slaughter

‘I don’t know another author so skilled at making me turn the page’ The Times

In his first work of nonfiction, the creator of the multimillion-selling Jack Reacher series explores the endurance of heroes from Achilles to Bond, showing us how this age-old myth is a fundamental part of what makes us human. He demonstrates how hero stories continue to shape our world – arguing that we need them now more than ever.

From the Stone Age to the Greek Tragedies, from Shakespeare to Robin Hood, we have always had our heroes. The hero is at the centre of formative myths in every culture and persists to this day in world-conquering books, films and TV shows. But why do these characters continue to inspire us, and why are they so central to storytelling?

Scalpel-sharp on the roots of storytelling and enlightening on the history and science of myth, The Hero is essential reading for anyone trying to write or understand fiction. Child teaches us how these stories still shape our minds and behaviour in an increasingly confusing modern world, and with his trademark concision and wit, demonstrates that however civilised we get, we’ll always need heroes.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Awful, pointless, inaccurate, out of date I agree this is overpriced, but because it’s dreadful, not because it’s short. If you’d like to read 75 pages of Lee Child blathering on about the Paleolithic storyteller with inaccurate dating (and Homer was certainly not the first Western written story), then the price is fine.Most of all, there’s no point. He just goes on and on about a subject he finds interesting, but which is far more accurately described elsewhere. He claims to be not so much interested in the scientific…

Anonymous says:

Ignore negative reviews. A succinct explanation of the evolution of fiction, and the hero. I’ve read pretty much every academic treatment of the history of literature, devices therein, and especially creation of myth and the hero. The most impacting and classic and inclusive would be “The Hero With A Thousand Faces,” by the late Joseph Campbell. Here, in this small, efficient volume, we get insight into Lee Child’s genius. He has carefully researched the history of “story,” and appropriately educates us on particular words we tend to take for granted in modern usage. So when a…

Anonymous says:

Good but overpriced for a small book Interesting and well written as usual by Lee Child. But way overpriced. It’s a small book – small in size, only 75 pages, larger than the normal font size.

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