Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future

August 24, 2019 - Comment

The New York Times-bestselling guide to how automation is changing the economy, undermining work, and reshaping our livesWinner of Best Business Book of the Year awards from the Financial Times and from Forbes“Lucid, comprehensive, and unafraid…;an indispensable contribution to a long-running argument.”–Los Angeles Times What are the jobs of the future? How many will there

The New York Times-bestselling guide to how automation is changing the economy, undermining work, and reshaping our lives
Winner of Best Business Book of the Year awards from the Financial Times and from Forbes
“Lucid, comprehensive, and unafraid…;an indispensable contribution to a long-running argument.”–Los Angeles Times

What are the jobs of the future? How many will there be? And who will have them? As technology continues to accelerate and machines begin taking care of themselves, fewer people will be necessary. Artificial intelligence is already well on its way to making “good jobs” obsolete: many paralegals, journalists, office workers, and even computer programmers are poised to be replaced by robots and smart software. As progress continues, blue and white collar jobs alike will evaporate, squeezing working- and middle-class families ever further. At the same time, households are under assault from exploding costs, especially from the two major industries-education and health care-that, so far, have not been transformed by information technology. The result could well be massive unemployment and inequality as well as the implosion of the consumer economy itself.
The past solutions to technological disruption, especially more training and education, aren’t going to work. We must decide, now, whether the future will see broad-based prosperity or catastrophic levels of inequality and economic insecurity. Rise of the Robots is essential reading to understand what accelerating technology means for our economic prospects-not to mention those of our children-as well as for society as a whole.

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Comments

Anonymous says:

Incredible book from page 75 on — An AI Professor’s Opinion I have taught Artificial Intelligence (AI) for 3 decades at a major university. Until about 10 years ago, whenever someone worried about the effect of intelligent software/hardware destroying future jobs, I would always give my “buggy whip” argument, which goes like this:”When the automobile was invented it DID destroy many jobs. Makers of buggy whips and horse troughs were put out of business. But many more NEW jobs were created to replace those older jobs. Witness…

Anonymous says:

A darker “The Second Machine” Martin Ford is among the technologists who have warned that technology is and will increasingly displace human beings across all employment sectors. This phenomenon will threaten the structural foundation of our capitalist economies fueled by consumer spending (that accounts for close to 70% of GDP in the US).His vision regarding the exponential growth of technology (Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Cloud computing, Internet and mobile apps, robots) is not all that different than…

Anonymous says:

Buy it. Read it. NOW. I read a ton of books, and cite/excerpt/link them on my main blog (Blog.KHIT.org). Rarely have I encountered one as oddly enjoyable as this one. Amiably well-written, amply documented, throwing down clear logic, and plausible scenario conjectures (based on his — always guarded — interpretations of his broad and deep documentation).Humans seem to be sleepwalking into a future regarding which they are largely unprepared. Will we slide into a dystopian techno-neo-feudalism when the…

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