Technology Strategy Patterns: Architecture as Strategy

October 15, 2019 - Comment

Technologists who want their ideas heard, understood, and funded are often told to speak the language of business—without really knowing what that is. This book’s toolkit provides architects, product managers, technology managers, and executives with a shared language—in the form of repeatable, practical patterns and templates—to produce great technology strategies. Author Eben Hewitt developed 39

Technologists who want their ideas heard, understood, and funded are often told to speak the language of business—without really knowing what that is. This book’s toolkit provides architects, product managers, technology managers, and executives with a shared language—in the form of repeatable, practical patterns and templates—to produce great technology strategies.

Author Eben Hewitt developed 39 patterns over the course of a decade in his work as CTO, CIO, and chief architect for several global tech companies. With these proven tools, you can define, create, elaborate, refine, and communicate your architecture goals, plans, and approach in a way that executives can readily understand, approve, and execute.

This book covers:

Architecture and strategy: Adopt a strategic architectural mindset to make a meaningful material impactCreating your strategy: Define the components of your technology strategy using proven patternsCommunicating the strategy: Convey your technology strategy in a compelling way to a variety of audiencesBringing it all together: Employ patterns individually or in clusters for specific problems; use the complete framework for a comprehensive strategy

Comments

Anonymous says:

Good book for Systems Architects and other big picture people I’m about a third of the way in and I will come back and update the review when finished. I can tell its a good book when I use the highlighter a lot in my Kindle. Good material on the value of architectural thinking to support strategy. 4 stars right now but if it continues strong, it could go to 5.

Anonymous says:

Wow, what a useful book! I teach technology management courses and this book has enough ideas to power an entire semester. What I love is that the patterns go from the top level (business model) to the bottom (non-functional requirements). They are all linked together in a clear pathway. Then, this book does something I’ve never seen before – it tells the architect how to communicate the information to the executives and to the technical team. Eminently practical advice. Wow.

Anonymous says:

A toolbox for approaching business/IT strategy The book fills an important niche that’s missed by most business or IT books: how to apply structured thinking to linking the business environment to an IT architecture. The book is less about “patterns” in the strict sense (which the author readily admits), but more like a tool box for folks engaging in defining a technology strategy. Many of the tools harvest from existing management consulting techniques with ample use of 2-by-2 matrices (which never fail when speaking to management): RACI,…

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