What Technology Wants

December 21, 2019 - Comment

From the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable— a sweeping vision of technology as a living force that can expand our individual potential    In this provocative book, one of today’s most respected thinkers turns the conversation about technology on its head by viewing technology as a natural system, an extension of biological evolution. By

From the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable— a sweeping vision of technology as a living force that can expand our individual potential 

 

In this provocative book, one of today’s most respected thinkers turns the conversation about technology on its head by viewing technology as a natural system, an extension of biological evolution. By mapping the behavior of life, we paradoxically get a glimpse at where technology is headed-or “what it wants.” Kevin Kelly offers a dozen trajectories in the coming decades for this near-living system. And as we align ourselves with technology’s agenda, we can capture its colossal potential. This visionary and optimistic book explores how technology gives our lives greater meaning and is a must-read for anyone curious about the future.

Product Features

  • Penguin Books

Comments

Anonymous says:

Incredibly Important One of the most thought provoking books in human history. The cofounder of Wired (who also spent half his life voluntarily, technologically homeless, so this is NOT a one-sided book) starts with a simple question: Where is technology going, what does it want, why, and what can we do about it? I can guarantee that you have many of the same concerns or (deep-seated uneasiness) that he describes.The answers are not simple, in fact that are impossibly complex. Tracing cosmological,…

Anonymous says:

Didn’t live up to the hype for me. I put this in the category of books where someone had a great presentation or TED talk and their friends said “you should write a book about it”. I couldn’t get past the repeated attribution of the notion of some technological thing ‘wanting’ something. They do what they are programmed to do, no more, no less. Perhaps when we get to strong AI in X number of years, but not today.

Anonymous says:

Even if you don’t fully share the view of the writer, it is worth reading The main idea is far from new. Similarities among different fields have been always used as a way to get new insights. However, this does not always work. There are excellent models like the ones by Stafford Beer and his comparison between biology and organizations and others that are fully trivial. This book has both: Some comparisons or some models are really brilliant and with a good support of data while others are obvious or less interesting.Technology or “technium” is not seen…

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