The Craft of Research, Third Edition (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

September 4, 2019 - Comment

With more than 400,000 copies now in print, The Craft of Research is the unrivaled resource for researchers at every level, from first-year undergraduates to research reporters at corporations and government offices. Seasoned researchers and educators Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams present an updated third edition of their classic handbook, whose first and second

With more than 400,000 copies now in print, The Craft of Research is the unrivaled resource for researchers at every level, from first-year undergraduates to research reporters at corporations and government offices. Seasoned researchers and educators Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams present an updated third edition of their classic handbook, whose first and second editions were written in collaboration with the late Wayne C. Booth. The Craft of Research explains how to build an argument that motivates readers to accept a claim; how to anticipate the reservations of readers and to respond to them appropriately; and how to create introductions and conclusions that answer that most demanding question, “So what?” The third edition includes an expanded discussion of the essential early stages of a research task: planning and drafting a paper. The authors have revised and fully updated their section on electronic research, emphasizing the need to distinguish between trustworthy sources (such as those found in libraries) and less reliable sources found with a quick Web search. A chapter on warrants has also been thoroughly reviewed to make this difficult subject easier for researchers Throughout, the authors have preserved the amiable tone, the reliable voice, and the sense of directness that have made this book indispensable for anyone undertaking a research project.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Great for undergraduate and graduate student researchers I have used Craft of Research in my undergraduate and graduate research methods courses for several years. The writing is clear and direct. The examples are plentiful. The organization is perfect for instruction. It opens with the question “Why do we do research?” Because everything we know of the world outside of our own experience is based upon the reports of research by others. Chapters 1 and 3 are essential. Why write up research reports? To understand, remember, and test our thinking. What…

Anonymous says:

and the authors could have done a better job of maintaining two or three illustrations throughout the … This text was required for my thesis class during my masters’ program. Parts of it are redundant to folks who have already done a few research projects, and the authors could have done a better job of maintaining two or three illustrations throughout the book. (Instead, they jump around between various theoretical topics, which undercuts the point of explaining how to develop on topic from concept to completion.) Still, it is full of tips and useful advice. As a student with some experience…

Anonymous says:

Good Antidote for “Just the Facts” Writing We all respect scientists–even budding science students–for their commitment to accuracy and objectivity. Sometimes our strengths are also our weaknesses. Beginning scientists can naively believe that their writing only needs to report the facts, that anything further is bias, sophistry or even dishonesty. This book lays out the path to a better writing style. Readers will learn how to arrange and present their facts and evidence as coherent arguments. As a result, they will better serve…

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