The Education of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation

September 22, 2019 - Comment

“A remarkable work of slowed-down journalism…They are doing their jobs as journalists and writing the first draft of history.” —Jill Filipovic, The Washington Post “…Generous but also damning.”  —Hanna Rosin, The New York Times From two New York Times reporters, a deeper look at the formative years of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and his confirmation. In September 2018,

“A remarkable work of slowed-down journalism…They are doing their jobs as journalists and writing the first draft of history.” —Jill Filipovic, The Washington Post

“…Generous but also damning.”  —Hanna Rosin, The New York Times

From two New York Times reporters, a deeper look at the formative years of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and his confirmation.

In September 2018, the F.B.I. was given only a week to investigate allegations of sexual misconduct against Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. But even as Kavanaugh was sworn in to his lifetime position, many questions remained unanswered, leaving millions of Americans unsettled.

During the Senate confirmation hearings that preceded the bureau’s brief probe, New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly broke critical stories about Kavanaugh’s past, including the “Renate Alumni” yearbook story. They were inundated with tips from former classmates, friends, and associates that couldn’t be fully investigated before the confirmation process closed. Now, their book fills in the blanks and explores the essential question: Who is Brett Kavanaugh?

The Education of Brett Kavanaugh paints a picture of the prep-school and Ivy-League worlds that formed our newest Supreme Court Justice. By offering commentary from key players from his confirmation process who haven’t yet spoken publicly and pursuing lines of inquiry that were left hanging, it will be essential reading for anyone who wants to understand our political system and Kavanaugh’s unexpectedly emblematic role in it.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Opinion book with glaring factual omissions that draws conclusions on “gut” feeling I did not vote for Trump in 2016, and I am far more interested in factual truth than which party “wins.” A friend gave me this to me to compare to Justice on Trial, which I finished last week.From what I’ve read, this book is nothing more than an attempt to have a one-sided debate to justify “I believe” mattering more than facts. This book basically argues that the “gut” feelings of people who don’t know Kavanaugh matter more than facts or the opinions of those that do…

Anonymous says:

Rating is based on NYT coverage I have not read the book. I did read the excerpt or article based on the book that appeared in The New York Times; an excerpt which bizarrely omitted the fact that the alleged victim of the new incident hasn’t discussed it with the reporters or in public, and her friends say that she doesn’t recall the incident; it also bizarrely omitted the fact that the person making the complaint was one of Bill Clinton’s lawyers in his defense against the Paula Jones lawsuit. It’s low-grade gossip that…

Anonymous says:

Based on lies and gossip. Do not buy! This book is a liberal attempt to destroy the reputation of a Supreme Court Justice based on lies and gossip. Do not support this propaganda by buying this trash!

Comments are disabled for this post.

The owner of this website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com.
Available for Amazon Prime