The Education of Little Tree

December 7, 2019 - Comment

The Education of Little Tree tells of a boy orphaned very young, who is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. “Little Tree” as his grandparents call him is shown how to hunt and survive in the mountains, to respect nature in the Cherokee

The Education of Little Tree tells of a boy orphaned very young, who is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression.

“Little Tree” as his grandparents call him is shown how to hunt and survive in the mountains, to respect nature in the Cherokee Way, taking only what is needed, leaving the rest for nature to run its course.

Little Tree also learns the often callous ways of white businessmen and tax collectors, and how Granpa, in hilarious vignettes, scares them away from his illegal attempts to enter the cash economy. Granma teaches Little Tree the joys of reading and education. But when Little Tree is taken away by whites for schooling, we learn of the cruelty meted out to Indian children in an attempt to assimilate them and of Little Tree’s perception of the Anglo world and how it differs from the Cherokee Way.

A classic of its era, and an enduring book for all ages, The Education of Little Tree has now been redesigned for this twenty-fifth anniversary edition.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Great Story for Readers of All Ages! I just finished reading “The Education of Little Tree” for the second time and I highly recommend it to people of all ages. Its charm lies in its point of view: an Indian boy sharing what he’s learned of the world around him through adventures with his Cherokee grandparents in the Tennessee mountains of Depression era America. We get the child’s impression of local characters, of bloviating politicians, of the illegal whiskey trade and of the casual prejudice of white people (which he often…

Anonymous says:

An Old Classic I’ve never read this book although I had heard of it before. This Is one of those books that leaves you thinking when you are done about the souls of people rather than what you see on the outside and what is really important in life. I don’t care whether the author is really a Cherokee Indian or not, it is written well enough that it is believable and makes you relate to the main characters, even though you have little in common with them.

Anonymous says:

A timeless story of growing into adulthood. Dont miss it. Give to your children My father gave me, my brothers and all his grand children this amazing story. I give it to boys and girls I come across in my volunteer work. Other reviews may tell you the story, I will tell you that will be a treasured addition to the collection of everyone who reads it. In a time of superficial fame and attention, this longtime favorite will last far beyond today’s news and will be read over and over

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