The Education of Margot Sanchez

December 12, 2019 - Comment

John Hughes’s Pretty in Pink comes to the South Bronx in this bold and “emotional story about class, race, hard work, and finding one’s place” (Publishers Weekly)—from debut author Lilliam Rivera.Things/People Margot Hates: Mami, for destroying her social life Papi, for allowing Junior to become a Neanderthal Junior, for becoming a Neanderthal The supermarket Everyone

John Hughes’s Pretty in Pink comes to the South Bronx in this bold and “emotional story about class, race, hard work, and finding one’s place” (Publishers Weekly)—from debut author Lilliam Rivera.

Things/People Margot Hates:
Mami, for destroying her social life
Papi, for allowing Junior to become a Neanderthal
Junior, for becoming a Neanderthal
The supermarket
Everyone else

After “borrowing” her father’s credit card to finance a more stylish wardrobe, Margot Sanchez suddenly finds herself grounded. And by grounded, she means working as an indentured servant in her family’s struggling grocery store to pay off her debts.

With each order of deli meat she slices, Margot can feel her carefully cultivated prep school reputation slipping through her fingers, and she’s willing to do anything to get out of this punishment. Lie, cheat, and maybe even steal…

Margot’s invitation to the ultimate beach party is within reach and she has no intention of letting her family’s drama or Moises—the admittedly good looking but outspoken boy from the neighborhood—keep her from her goal.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Margot is NOT educated by the end, and this should have been written as a tragedy. Lilliam Rivera is clearly an adept writer, but I cannot love this book as much as I would have liked. The class issues in this book are not handled well. Margot and her family treat people who are poorer than them terribly and then dole out apologies at the end, as if all can be forgiven so easily. Race, Afro-Latinidad, is mentioned frequently, via hair texture and curves, but mainly in a way where the curves are awkward or need to be controlled, or hair has to be tamed. Never do any of the…

Anonymous says:

The family life and hardships make this book worth reading. This book was adorable and I loved every minute reading its words. The characters were so personal, I loved the free flowing language no italics for Spanish, and it felt like I was there. I love books that engage you and leave you with a good feeling even if everything that can go wrong is going wrong in the story. I will also state that some things a universal, good parents and bad parents are something we can all relate too, honestly. Keeping your problems hidden and never letting the world…

Anonymous says:

Rivera’s PR Princess Struggles to Caarve Her Own Path The Education of Margot Sanchez was pretty dang cool okay. It starts out with this bratty little girl who thinks she’s too good for all these BS family “the more you know” teachable moments, but then she gets educated in multiple ways.She makes all these lists of all the things she thinks she knows or hates in the moment, but as she goes along through her journey, these lists evolve right along side her.Margot’s real journey begins because she’s trying to follow advice…

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