The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World In Flux

October 16, 2019 - Comment

A leading educational thinker argues that the American university is stuck in the past–and shows how we can revolutionize it for our era of constant change Our current system of higher education dates to the period from 1865 to 1925. It was in those decades that the nation’s new universities created grades and departments, majors

A leading educational thinker argues that the American university is stuck in the past–and shows how we can revolutionize it for our era of constant change
Our current system of higher education dates to the period from 1865 to 1925. It was in those decades that the nation’s new universities created grades and departments, majors and minors, all in an attempt to prepare young people for a world transformed by the telegraph and the Model T.

As Cathy N. Davidson argues in The New Education, this approach to education is wholly unsuited to the era of the gig economy. From the Ivy League to community colleges, she introduces us to innovators who are remaking college for our own time by emphasizing student-centered learning that values creativity in the face of change above all. The New Education ultimately shows how we can teach students not only to survive but to thrive amid the challenges to come.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Some ideas to consider, not all new This book has some interesting ideas to think about in higher education. The author takes an anecdotal, story-telling approach, so read it for that and to explore some ideas. Don’t expect this book to have a scholarly approach with lots of primary references for further research, because those are present only on some of the topics. While I found some inspiration and curriculum development approaches here, I also found oversimplification and a pretty black-and-white separation of colleges…

Anonymous says:

There is no doubt that education is both more important … There is no doubt that education is both more important than ever and, at the same time, suffering from a wide range of challenges, attacks, self-doubts, and crises. The New Education reminds us of two crucial ideas, at least concerning higher education. First, that the current structure of higher education–the structures of disciplines, the particular ways scholarship and teaching are unequally tethered together–are historical developments. The university has been changed in profound ways…

Anonymous says:

A valuable start to reform of our educational institutions The author of this book has studied the history of education in the United States and the discussion often reflects this knowledge, providing perspective that is missed when we are limited only to our own memories (even if you’re old like me). For example, it’s great fun to learn that slide rules were once regarded as evil intrusions on manual computation. And the fact that we fixed things once (in the late 19th century) is always helpful in the belief that we can do it again. The book tells…

Comments are disabled for this post.

The owner of this website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com.