Flexible Dieting 2.0: A Flexible Nutrition Philosophy for the Modern Athlete

September 7, 2019 - Comment

The first edition of Flexible Dieting was released in February of 2014, without the expectation that it would be so widely read. There is a lot of information available to read online when it comes to flexible dieting and I didn’t expect to stand out from the crowd in any way. I specifically wrote it

The first edition of Flexible Dieting was released in February of 2014, without the expectation that it would be so widely read. There is a lot of information available to read online when it comes to flexible dieting and I didn’t expect to stand out from the crowd in any way. I specifically wrote it for my clientele in hopes to reduce email volume by compiling info into a short ebook that could answer a lot of the questions I was receiving. It was a very entry level, novice text designed to explain the basics for people who had never heard of flexible dieting. It helped a lot of people get started and that is something I’m proud of. The first book was designed to improve people’s mindset when it comes to food, and teach moderation. 1. What am I trying to prove with my writing style? I was slightly abrasive and immature in the first book, and it was obvious that I felt like I needed to defend flexible dieting and justify my eating behavior. When I reread the book, it sounded like a sales pitch to me and that’s not what it was intended to be. I want my writing to be well researched and a learning tool for whomever is reading it. So I started doing research daily to better support my claims and explain my message opposed to me being an asshole and suggesting people listen to me “just because”. I want my products to be well respected and of the highest quality. This meant interviews, sources, better design, and an editor. 2. This is not suitable for athletes. The info was a great starting point and only that. There wasn’t anything specifically written for an athlete as I only touched the surface of many important subjects rather than delving deep. I wanted to present something that could benefit every athlete. The second realization made me notice that there isn’t much out there with regards to flexible dieting for athletes. It also made me realize I wanted to create something that would change the way people view themselves. The end goal is to get more people to actually view themselves as athletes, rather than just people trying to lose weight. This is when I made the decision to do a full rewrite to better suit an expanding and increasingly diverse audience. Which brings me to the tile: “FD 2.0: A Flexible Nutrition Philosophy for the Modern Athlete”. Who is the modern athlete? You are, whether it’s your first month using a barbell or you’ve gone to the Olympics. There are obviously different scales of athleticism, and even if you are at the very bottom of that scale with 100 pounds to lose, you are still an athlete if you are training hard, and you should treat yourself accordingly. Your body is no less valuable even if, unlike a professional athlete, your body isn’t your livelihood. Another thing worth mentioning is that I toyed with the idea of renaming the book “Flexible Nutrition” as the word “dieting” has somewhat of a negative connotation. However I refrained for two reasons, (1) familiarity purposes, and (2) I don’t want anyone to think that I am attempting to reinvent the wheel, hence the tagline “a flexible nutrition philosophy”, as that’s precisely what it is. Before you start reading, be forewarned about some major changes you will see. Unlike the first book, there are no rigid rules in place, there’s no requirement that you hit your macros dead-on, and there are more options this time around to help you achieve success. Enjoy!

Comments

Anonymous says:

Life changing read! For year’s I always heard the term “macro’s” and “micros” when I was lifting but had no idea what that meant. So a gal who owns Bliss Fit told me about this book by Krissy to get a better idea what macro’s were and it broke it down so simply and the whole idea of flexible nutrition and not being so hard on IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macro’s). It’s ok to have a doughnut while being flexible so we don’t completely fall off the wagon as one doughnut isn’t going to kill all progress…

Anonymous says:

Love it! So glad to have a hard copy of this book. I’ve studied and implemented various nutritional approaches over the years, and the flexible dieting approach has provided me with the tools that have resulted in the most success. I’m not only getting leaner while staying strong with this approach, but I’m repairing my relationship with food and have stopped demonizing certain macronutrient categories. Even though there seems to be a lot of flexible dieting professionals these days, Krissy Mae Kagney…

Anonymous says:

Must read Great book easy to read and understand. Starting to follow to go along with my crossfit and I am loving the building of my new relationship with food.

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