An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States (ReVisioning American History)

December 10, 2019 - Comment

2015 Recipient of the American Book Award The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples  Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long

2015 Recipient of the American Book Award

The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples
 
Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire.

In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.”
 
Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

Product Features

  • Beacon Press

Comments

Anonymous says:

I understand in part why the things I’m about to say I didn’t like about this book are Things I want to say: I understand in part why the things I’m about to say I didn’t like about this book are Things. I also want to say that this could be a pretty damn useful teaching tool if taught in excerpts? But I wouldn’t recommend reading the entire thing without planning to read some follow-up books–of which she wonderfully lists in the back, so you have a lot to go off of!So, my little baby complaint is that this book is meant for a popular audience and uses settler colonialism…

Anonymous says:

MIND SHATTERING – SUPREMELY SIGNIFICANT! An Indigenous People’s History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz may be the most important book I have ever read. That is a personal and subjective remark, but true. As an indoctrinated child of the U.S. public education system and a graduate of a U.S. University with a degree in U.S. History, and a lifetime of autodidactic immersion into the study of U.S. History, my reaction to this thoroughly researched and painstakingly documented presentation of an alternative perspective was…

Anonymous says:

No intellectually honest scholarship here, don’t waste your money. I read the introduction of An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, and wouldn’t have gone any further if this wasn’t assigned reading for a Comunity College Native American Studies class (I already had a history degree, but the class was a prereq for a grad program). Chapter one was pleasant enough, but it seemed nothing much more than a large collection of “see? Native Americans weren’t primitive, really!” After that, this book is a mish-mash of cherry-picked facts chosen to…

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