The History of the Ancient World: From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome

November 11, 2019 - Comment

A lively and engaging narrative history showing the common threads in the cultures that gave birth to our own. This is the first volume in a bold new series that tells the stories of all peoples, connecting historical events from Europe to the Middle East to the far coast of China, while still giving weight

A lively and engaging narrative history showing the common threads in the cultures that gave birth to our own.

This is the first volume in a bold new series that tells the stories of all peoples, connecting historical events from Europe to the Middle East to the far coast of China, while still giving weight to the characteristics of each country. Susan Wise Bauer provides both sweeping scope and vivid attention to the individual lives that give flesh to abstract assertions about human history. This narrative history employs the methods of “history from beneath” – literature, epic traditions, private letters, and accounts – to connect kings and leaders with the lives of those they ruled. The result is an engrossing tapestry of human behavior from which we may draw conclusions about the direction of world events and the causes behind them.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Not as secular as they claim. My gifted child quickly pointed out numerous statements made throughout this book that have religious undertones. The author dots this book with personal opinions and conclusions that easily disputable. My child is a huge history buff and was able to identify the difference between facts and inferences, in particular those that had to do with religion. We dropped the program and the books as a result. We found the same to be true in Story of the World, which is written for younger children…

Anonymous says:

once-over-lightly history of the ancient world that offers a good introduction to the topic for the general reader This is a breezy, once-over-lightly history of the ancient world that offers a good introduction to the topic for the general reader. To her credit, Bauer is a nimble writer and a pleasant guide through what could be arid material. She also includes discussions of civilizations–especially China and India– too often left out of ancient histories, though these can feel tacked on, connected to the central narrative by phrases like: “Meanwhile, at the other end of the Silk Road…” A…

Anonymous says:

do not buy The book had mostly positive reviews (???)I received the book yesterday; while browsing, I read that ” Menelaus was King of Sparta who married a princess from city of Argos, a city which lay north of his own , Helen”Menelaus was the younger son of Atreus, king of Mycenae and he became King of Sparta , by marrying Helen, daughter of Zeus and Leda, the wife of the Spartan king Tyndareus.I do not believe that somebody who writes this, is qualified to write a book about the…

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