The History of the Medieval World: From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade

September 12, 2019 - Comment

A masterful narrative of the Middle Ages, when religion became a weapon for kings all over the world. In her earlier work, The History of the Ancient World, Susan Wise Bauer wrote of the rise of kingship based on might. But in the years between the fourth and twelfth centuries, rulers had to find new

A masterful narrative of the Middle Ages, when religion became a weapon for kings all over the world.

In her earlier work, The History of the Ancient World, Susan Wise Bauer wrote of the rise of kingship based on might. But in the years between the fourth and twelfth centuries, rulers had to find new justification for their power, and they turned to divine truth or grace to justify political and military action. Right began to replace might as the engine of empire.

Not just Christianity and Islam but also the religions of the Persians, the Germans, and the Mayas were pressed into the service of the state. Even Buddhism and Confucianism became tools for nation building. This phenomenon―stretching from the Americas all the way to Japan―changed religion, but it also changed the state.

The History of the Medieval World is a true world history, linking the great conflicts of Europe to the titanic struggles for power in India and Asia. In its pages, El Cid and Guanggaeto, Julian the Apostate and the Brilliant Emperor, Charles the Hammer and Krum the Bulgarian stand side by side. From the schism between Rome and Constantinople to the rise of the Song Dynasty, from the mission of Muhammad to the crowning of Charlemagne, from the sacred wars of India to the establishment of the Knights Templar, this erudite book tells the fascinating, often violent story of kings, generals, and the peoples they ruled.

4 illustrations; 46 maps

Product Features

  • W W Norton Company

Comments

Anonymous says:

Highly Recommended! I spent a few years reading American History and then decided to try European, starting with the Middle Ages. I am no historian and I have minimal prior knowledge, so I was looking for a good introduction to the Middle Ages. I tried Manchester’s and quickly set it aside. It contained errors even an amateur like me could spot. I then tried Wickham’s…

Anonymous says:

Lacking in important info, plus adding some unneeded details. I am a 16 year old homeschooler and I finished this book in about a year, reading it on and off. I found the book very well researched and expertly written, but there were some details (particularly about the church schism in 1054) I was displeased with. I found the Eastern church (of which I am a member) depicted in a very warped fashion, both in the case of the schism and in general. There are two sides to every argument, and I feel that both sides of this issue were not properly addressed…

Anonymous says:

Very poor book I just finished Reading A. Goldsworthy books about Cesar, Augustus and the fall of the Roman Empire and was looking for a book about middle ages. THis book is just a list of names and avents – gives no insight about couses of certain events or changes in the society. Very low quality history book

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