The Anger Workbook for Teens: Activities to Help You Deal with Anger and Frustration

January 19, 2020 - Comment

Fully revised and updated based on reader feedback! This second edition of The Anger Workbook for Teens includes brand-new activities to help you understand and interact with your anger, and tips for managing it in constructive ways.Does your anger often get you into trouble? Do you react to situations and later regret how you behaved?

Fully revised and updated based on reader feedback! This second edition of The Anger Workbook for Teens includes brand-new activities to help you understand and interact with your anger, and tips for managing it in constructive ways.

Does your anger often get you into trouble? Do you react to situations and later regret how you behaved? Does your anger cause problems with other people? If so, you aren’t alone. Between family life, friends, social media, and the pressures of school, there’s no doubt that it’s stressful being a teenager. And while anger is a natural human emotion, different people handle it differently. Some hold in their anger and let it build, some lash out with hurtful words, and some resort to fighting. If you’ve noticed yourself beginning to take out your frustrations on the people you love most—your parents, brothers or sisters, and friends—it’s time to make a change.

This second edition of The Anger Workbook for Teens includes brand-new skills and activities based in clinically proven treatments such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to help you deal with negative thoughts without losing control. You’ll find out what’s triggering your anger, look at the ways you react, be more aware of your thoughts and how you interact with them, and learn skills and techniques for managing anger without losing your cool. You’ll develop a personal anger profile and learn to notice the physical symptoms you feel when you become enraged, then find out how to calm those feelings and respond more sensitively to others. Once you fully understand your anger, you’ll be better prepared to deal with your feelings in the moment.

As you begin the activities in this workbook, it’s perfectly normal to feel angrier at first. That’s because you are being asked to really notice and examine the things that make you angry. But with practice, you’ll learn to handle frustrating situations in real life and more effectively communicate your feelings. Most importantly, you’ll learn the difference between healthy anger—the kind that can motivate you to make positive changes—and problematic anger that leads to negative consequences.

Change isn’t easy, but with the right frame of mind and set of skills, you can do it. This book is designed to help you understand how both your mind and body respond to anger, and how you can handle this anger in more constructive ways.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Great for starting conversations. I use this workbook to springboard conversations with my 12 year old, who is prone to impulsive, emotional and angry outbursts. We do not write in the book, and while we started out just going through it sequentially module by module, sometimes we skip around if I see a particular topic that relates to an issue we are having at the moment. For this purpose, this book is perfect for us. It is a little cheesy here or there, and there have been times where my son and I can’t help but stop and make…

Anonymous says:

Great Purchase! This series of teen workbooks is one of the most valuable resources I have found for counseling my at risk teenage students! I purchased the anxiety, anger, self esteem and overcoming negative feelings handbooks and I was honestly nervous. So many of the tools avaliable to address teen needs are dated and are taken as nothing but a joke by those they are designed to help. My 6th-12th graders happily and often eagerly engage in the questionnaires and activities in these books! They also have…

Anonymous says:

Good resource for counselors or teachers working with older kids It is sometimes very difficult to engage teenagers who are referred for anger management counseling. A workbook with relatively easy, straightforward exercises is a useful tool to start them communicating and thinking about their bad feelings and sometimes worse behaviors before rapport has built. I recommend this book to anyone working with teenagers. I’ve even used a couple of the exercises with siblings and other family members so they can share feelings, etc. and see how different people…

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