Gulliver’s Travels (Dover Thrift Editions)

February 3, 2020 - Comment

Regarded as the preeminent prose satirist in the English language, Jonathan Swift (1667–1745) intended this masterpiece, as he once wrote Alexander Pope, to “vex the world rather than divert it.” Savagely ironic, it portrays man as foolish at best, and at worst, not much more than an ape.The direct and unadorned narrative describes four remarkable

Regarded as the preeminent prose satirist in the English language, Jonathan Swift (1667–1745) intended this masterpiece, as he once wrote Alexander Pope, to “vex the world rather than divert it.” Savagely ironic, it portrays man as foolish at best, and at worst, not much more than an ape.
The direct and unadorned narrative describes four remarkable journies of ship’s surgeon Lemuel Gulliver, among them, one to the land of Lilliput, where six-inch-high inhabitants bicker over trivialities; and another to Brobdingnag, a land where giants reduce man to insignificance.
Written with disarming simplicity and careful attention to detail, this classic is diverse in its appeal: for children, it remains an enchanting fantasy. For adults, it is a witty parody of political life in Swift’s time and a scathing send-up of manners and morals in 18th-century England.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Worth a look for the curious, but still a tedious read Reader be warned — despite being adapted into various kids’ books and movies over time, “Gulliver’s Travels” is NOT a children’s book. The concept may sound like a children’s fairy tale, but Jonathan Swift intended this book to be a parody of the travel books of his time, as well as a scathing satire of British culture and government of the day. And to be honest… despite the imaginative concepts behind it, it’s a very tedious book to plow through. It’s worth a read at least once, to get…

Anonymous says:

An interesting, intriguing, edge of your seat book I read the Illustrated Classics version as a kid and when I was in my mid-teens, I read the full version. To this day, I am still enjoying both versions; which one I read depends on my mood and how I feel.The author uses great metaphors, like storms, to transition between different islands. Each change in setting teaches many important lessons without the reader really realizing it. How the author does this is a mystery and keeps the reader hooked,, wanting to know what will happen next…

Anonymous says:

Fun Read – Unabridged I’m glad there is a company keeping up the unabridged versions. For those looking for unabridged.. you probably know what that means. For others, it just means uncut or parts not removed. This is required in cases of book reports and projects… or those that want the full story.The print is pretty small. This is not a complaint from me as it doesn’t bother me. Just a heads up if you have trouble with smaller font / print.Overall we are very happy with the book. It’s…

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