Gulliver’s Travels

August 17, 2019 - Comment

Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, better known simply as Gulliver’s Travels (1726, amended 1735), is a novel by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of

Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, better known simply as Gulliver’s Travels (1726, amended 1735), is a novel by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the “travellers’ tales” literary subgenre. It is Swift’s best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.

Comments

Anonymous says:

Not Remotely Good I realize that Gulliver’s Travels is a classic, and I had fairly high expectations for it, but the novel didn’t work for me in any way, shape, or form. Where do I start? First, the novel has no shred of believability. It would have been find if Gulliver landed in Lilliput, did his thing with the Lilliputians and that was the end of it. What’s the likelihood that a single individual could land in five undiscovered places in the 18th century world? You can only suspend disbelief so much…

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